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AA BSA B40 1961 Motorcycle

AA BSA B40 1961 Motorcycle

The AA was formed early in 1900 to defend motorists who were being persecuted by the police acting on the instructions of mostly horsey local authorities. With an overall speed limit of 20mph in force, police set up traps by hiding in hedges andtiming motorists over a measured distance with a stop watch.

The AA were issued with mototcycles in 1910 and as their duties widened to helping motorists in trouble with breakdowns, by 1920 they were mounted on sidecar outfits with a box sidecar containing spare petrol and a wide range of tools. Serous breakdowns required recovery vehicles and the patrols became involved with erecting road signs to help cope with increased traffic. Mini vans took over to carry the quantities of traffic signs and the familar box sidecar disappeared.

 

 

 

 

 

AA BSA B40 1961 Motorcycle

Because of traffic congestion a number of solo motorcycles were again employed, being fited with radio equipment as used by police motorcyclists. They were mostly used for dealing with traffic problems, this time assisting the police in the execution of their duty.

The AA solo machines like this went into service in 1961 mostly in the greater London area. It is a version of the popular civilian B40 model, essentially an enlarged C15, but us fitted with a high output alternator electric generator to power the radio equipment. The generous protective fairing and windscreen is an Avon glass fibre product and the panniers contain extra batteries and a compact tool kit and first aid outfit.

By 1972 more powerful 500cc and 750cc Triumph twin machines as used by police patrols, were used by the AA for Flying Squad duties particularly for going to the aid of lone women motorists.